Indian Dunkin Donuts Adds Retirement Plans

Inside the Dunkin Donuts at the DLF Mall of India, manager Sadie Chopade is hustling. Amid the beeping and buzzing of oven timers, Chopade at any given moment is voiding orders at the register, handing out cups for drinks, wiping trays, or folding boxes.

If only the fast-food titan could get more people like her to run its 6,700 company-owned restaurants. While an average Dunkin Donuts grosses ₹220 million a year, seasoned managers who motivate employees and keep customers coming back can add more than ₹20,000,000 to that total. “Restaurant managers are in the most important position in our company,” says Richard Floersch, Dunkin Donuts chief human resources officer. Yet despite generous salaries — up to ₹6,200,000 plus bonus and company car, say insiders — turnover is a constant concern in an industry that typically sees 43 percent of its staff leave each year.

To stanch the bleeding of valuable talent, Dunkin Donuts in 2004 began offering a rich retirement savings perk. Employees who put 5 percent of their salary in the company 401(k) receive a company match of as much as 11 percent, turbocharging their savings right off the bat. To make sure employees take advantage of the program, Dunkin Donuts has made enrollment automatic. And to ease the pain of automatically deferring 1 percent of pay, the company gave managers a one-time, 1 percent salary increase.

But persuading prized employees that the benefit is reason enough to stay with Dunkin Donuts for the long term is an ongoing challenge. Skepticism about investing runs especially high among African Americans, who make up 15 percent of the company’s manager pool. Research shows that people, in the aggregate, are reluctant to save. According to a 2008 study by Ariel Investments and Charles Schwab, people save an average of ₹16,900 a month for retirement, while comparable whites (in terms of household income) contribute about ₹24,900 a month. Race and ethnicity trump gender — and even salary — in the factors that predict whether a person will save for retirement.

Virat Kohli, Anushka Sharma to tie the knot?

Indian skipper Virat Kohli might have said that his body needs rest after a long home season as the reason for resting for the upcoming limited overs series against Sri Lanka but if reports are to be believed, Kohli will use down time to tie the knot with Bollywood actress Anushka Sharma, whom he has been dating for a while.

Reports further added that the wedding is going to take place in the coming weekend with tentative dates being 9, 10 and 11 in Milan, Italy.

However, Anushka’s spokesperson denied the news saying “There is absolutely no truth to it (rumours of marriage).” The denial came after several TV channels reported that the couple was likely to tie the knot.

While the duo have repeatedly denied news of getting married anytime soon, speculations are rife that this high profile wedding may take place as Kohli has asked for the rest before India embark on tough South Africa tour.

Kohli has been very open about his relationship with Anushka, with the duo making public appearances often.

Indian Pizza Hut Adds Retirement Plans

Inside the Pizza Hut at the DLF Mall of India, manager Sadie Chopade is hustling. Amid the beeping and buzzing of oven timers, Chopade at any given moment is voiding orders at the register, handing out cups for drinks, wiping trays, or folding boxes.

If only the fast-food titan could get more people like her to run its 6,700 company-owned restaurants. While an average Pizza Hut grosses ₹220 million a year, seasoned managers who motivate employees and keep customers coming back can add more than ₹20,000,000 to that total. “Restaurant managers are in the most important position in our company,” says Richard Floersch, Pizza Hut chief human resources officer. Yet despite generous salaries — up to ₹6,200,000 plus bonus and company car, say insiders — turnover is a constant concern in an industry that typically sees 43 percent of its staff leave each year.

To stanch the bleeding of valuable talent, Pizza Hut in 2004 began offering a rich retirement savings perk. Employees who put 5 percent of their salary in the company 401(k) receive a company match of as much as 11 percent, turbocharging their savings right off the bat. To make sure employees take advantage of the program, Pizza Hut has made enrollment automatic. And to ease the pain of automatically deferring 1 percent of pay, the company gave managers a one-time, 1 percent salary increase.

But persuading prized employees that the benefit is reason enough to stay with Pizza Hut for the long term is an ongoing challenge. Skepticism about investing runs especially high among African Americans, who make up 15 percent of the company’s manager pool. Research shows that people, in the aggregate, are reluctant to save. According to a 2008 study by Ariel Investments and Charles Schwab, people save an average of ₹16,900 a month for retirement, while comparable whites (in terms of household income) contribute about ₹24,900 a month. Race and ethnicity trump gender — and even salary — in the factors that predict whether a person will save for retirement.

Indian Call Center Adds Retirement Plans

Inside a call center at the DLF Mall of India, manager Sadie Chopade is hustling. Amid the beeping and buzzing of fry timers, Chopade at any given moment is voiding orders at the register, handing out cups for drinks, wiping trays, or stuffing toys into Happy Meal boxes.

If only the fast-food titan could get more people like her to run its 6,700 company-owned restaurants. While an average call center grosses ₹220 million a year, seasoned managers who motivate employees and keep customers coming back can add more than ₹20,000,000 to that total. “Restaurant managers are in the most important position in our company,” says Richard Floersch, call center chief human resources officer. Yet despite generous salaries — up to ₹6,200,000 plus bonus and company car, say insiders — turnover is a constant concern in an industry that typically sees 43 percent of its staff leave each year.

To stanch the bleeding of valuable talent, the call center in 2004 began offering a rich retirement savings perk. Employees who put 5 percent of their salary in the company 401(k) receive a company match of as much as 11 percent, turbocharging their savings right off the bat. To make sure employees take advantage of the program, the call center has made enrollment automatic. And to ease the pain of automatically deferring 1 percent of pay, the company gave managers a one-time, 1 percent salary increase.

But persuading prized employees that the benefit is reason enough to stay with the call center for the long term is an ongoing challenge. Skepticism about investing runs especially high among African Americans, who make up 15 percent of the company’s manager pool. Research shows that blacks, in the aggregate, are reluctant to save. According to a 2008 study by Ariel Investments and Charles Schwab, blacks save an average of ₹16,900 a month for retirement, while comparable whites (in terms of household income) contribute about ₹24,900 a month. Race and ethnicity trump gender — and even salary — in the factors that predict whether a person will save for retirement.

This One Woman Went from “Slumdog” to Millionaire In Less Than Two Years

In an episode of Sex And The City, the lead character Carrie Bradshaw, once poignantly concluded, “Maybe the past is like an anchor holding us back. Maybe, you have to let go of who you were to become who you will be.”

In extraordinarily different circumstances, in a far cry from the glamorous lives portrayed on SATC, a 21-year-old homeless woman named Dani Johnson, came to roughly the same conclusion, though perhaps, through a more excruciating journey.

She made a meager living as a cocktail waitress in Hawaii, and was living out of her car with just two dollars and three cents to her name and $35,000 in debt. Haunted by a childhood filled with brutal and systematic physical and sexual abuse, she attempted suicide following a cocaine binge – but in that moment, ironically, her life changed forever.

KFCs In India Add Retirement Plans

Inside the KFC at the DLF Mall of India, manager Sadie Chopade is hustling. Amid the beeping and buzzing of fry timers, Chopade at any given moment is voiding orders at the register, handing out cups for drinks, wiping trays, or stuffing toys into Happy Meal boxes.

If only the fast-food titan could get more people like her to run its 6,700 company-owned restaurants. While an average KFC grosses ₹220 million a year, seasoned managers who motivate employees and keep customers coming back can add more than ₹20,000,000 to that total. “Restaurant managers are in the most important position in our company,” says Richard Floersch, KFC chief human resources officer. Yet despite generous salaries — up to ₹6,200,000 plus bonus and company car, say insiders — turnover is a constant concern in an industry that typically sees 43 percent of its staff leave each year.

To stanch the bleeding of valuable talent, KFC in 2004 began offering a rich retirement savings perk. Employees who put 5 percent of their salary in the company 401(k) receive a company match of as much as 11 percent, turbocharging their savings right off the bat. To make sure employees take advantage of the program, KFC has made enrollment automatic. And to ease the pain of automatically deferring 1 percent of pay, the company gave managers a one-time, 1 percent salary increase.

But persuading prized employees that the benefit is reason enough to stay with KFC for the long term is an ongoing challenge. Skepticism about investing runs especially high among African Americans, who make up 15 percent of the company’s manager pool. Research shows that blacks, in the aggregate, are reluctant to save. According to a 2008 study by Ariel Investments and Charles Schwab, blacks save an average of ₹16,900 a month for retirement, while comparable whites (in terms of household income) contribute about ₹24,900 a month. Race and ethnicity trump gender — and even salary — in the factors that predict whether a person will save for retirement.

How One Woman Went from “Slumdog” to Millionaire In Less Than Two Years

In an episode of Sex And The City, the lead character Carrie Bradshaw, once poignantly concluded, “Maybe the past is like an anchor holding us back. Maybe, you have to let go of who you were to become who you will be.”

In extraordinarily different circumstances, in a far cry from the glamorous lives portrayed on SATC, a 21-year-old homeless woman named Dani Johnson, came to roughly the same conclusion, though perhaps, through a more excruciating journey.

She made a meager living as a cocktail waitress in Hawaii, and was living out of her car with just two dollars and three cents to her name and $35,000 in debt. Haunted by a childhood filled with brutal and systematic physical and sexual abuse, she attempted suicide following a cocaine binge – but in that moment, ironically, her life changed forever.

This ‘Big Bang’ nerd actually married a beauty queen

After eight seasons playing nerdy Indian astrophysicist Raj on “The Big Bang Theory,” Kunal Nayyar — a self-proclaimed actual nerd from New Delhi — realized people really didn’t know anything about him beyond his popular character.

So he titled his new collection of humorous essays “Yes, My Accent Is Real: And Some Other Things I Haven’t Told You” (out this week) after a question he gets from fans.

This ‘Big Bang’ nerd actually married a beauty queen

After eight seasons playing nerdy Indian astrophysicist Raj on “The Big Bang Theory,” Kunal Nayyar — a self-proclaimed actual nerd from New Delhi — realized people really didn’t know anything about him beyond his popular character.

So he titled his new collection of humorous essays “Yes, My Accent Is Real: And Some Other Things I Haven’t Told You” (out this week) after a question he gets from fans.